Is propane safe for my family and me?

Yes. Propane is a very safe fuel. But as with any energy source, there are steps you should take to further ensure your safety:

  • If you detect a gas leak, immediately evacuate everyone from the house and call us from a neighbor’s telephone.
  • Learn what propane smells like. We have pamphlets to help your family recognize its distinctive odor.
  • Know where gas lines are located, so you won’t damage them when digging or working in the yard.
  • Change or clean furnace filters regularly as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Don’t store cleaning fluids, oil-soaked rags, gasoline, or other flammable liquids near a gas-burning appliance, where vapors could be ignited by the pilot light.
How can I recognize a propane leak in my home?

Propane has a strong, unpleasant smell, like rotten eggs, a skunk’s spray, or a dead animal. Propane manufacturers add the smell deliberately to help alert customers to propane leaks, which can create a safety hazard.  Ask us for a demonstration to help everyone in your home or building identify leaks.

What should I do if there's a problem with a propane appliance?

Never modify or repair a propane appliance’s valves, regulators, connectors, controls, or a propane tank’s cylinder or parts. Instead, immediately call us. We can inspect, adjust, repair, or replace any part of your propane system. Remember, your propane system incorporates special components to keep them safe for use.

What should I do if my pilot light goes out?

Contact us to evaluate the appliance and relight the pilot light, which is a small, constantly burning flame inside the appliance that ignites the main burner. A pilot light that repeatedly goes out — or is difficult to light — may be signaling that there is a problem with the appliance or your propane system. Accidents and serious injuries can occur when customers attempt to fix a pilot light problem on their own.

What assurance do I have that propane technicians are properly trained?

Propane is used safely by millions of Americans — and stored, handled, and transported by thousands of professionals — every day. That safety comes from a combination of stringent codes and regulations and our industry’s extensive training and safety awareness programs. In fact, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) operate the Certified Employee Training Program (CETP), through which propane technicians train and get certified in all aspects of delivering propane and installing and servicing propane appliances. We update our training programs frequently to ensure that our employees are equipped with the most current procedures and information available.

Can a propane technician convert a natural gas furnace to propane?

Yes. Many furnaces originally built for natural gas can be converted to propane. For details, contact us.